Whip-It Up Wednesday: The Math in My Cake

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Looking for an excuse to eat chocolate cake?  Well, look no further. This delicious recipe is flourless, dense, moist  and educational.

 I guess you can have your cake and eat it, too!

There are several versions of this wonderful treat online. But this is my favorite, from www.allrecipes.com.

Top with fresh berries, dust with powdered sugar or make a fresh berry sauce to serve along side.

You can't go wrong with Educational Chocolate Cake.

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup white sugar
18 (1 ounce) squares, bittersweet chocolate
1 cup unsalted butter
6 eggs

DIRECTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Grease one 10-inch round cake pan and set aside.
2. In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the water, salt and sugar. Stir until completely dissolved and set aside.
3. Either in the top half of a double boiler or in a microwave oven, melt the bittersweet chocolate. Pour the chocolate into the bowl of an electric mixer.
4. Cut the butter into pieces and beat the butter into the chocolate, 1 piece at a time. Beat in the hot sugar-water. Slowly beat in the eggs, one at a time.
5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Have a pan larger than the cake pan ready; put the cake pan in the larger pan and fill the pan with boiling water halfway up the sides of the cake pan.
6. Bake cake in the water bath at 300 degrees F (150 degrees C) for 45 minutes. The center will still look wet. Chill cake overnight in the pan. To unmold, dip the bottom of the cake pan in hot water for 10 seconds and invert onto a serving plate.

Use this recipe for a hands-on math lesson at home.

Another alternative, as a student and teacher favorite, incorporate this lesson as a graded "do at home" math enrichment project.  Bringing your teacher a slice is a requirement. 


Students can dive into the good stuff, like circumference, radius, diameter, areasector  and cake.





 

Enjoy a FREE PDF of this assignment.  Have fun learning and baking.  As always, we'd love to hear more great ideas having to do with baking and math from you.